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EPT Champ Peter Jepsen rumored to be Mystery High Stakes Poker Cheater

Over the past few days, there's been heavy discussion about a former high stakes online poker player who cheated others out of "several million Euros." The player is currently being investigated by Denmark’s Economic Crime Department, and charges have already been leveled at two individuals in the case. However, police are still waiting to charge the poker player until their investigation has concluded. But if it were up to the TwoPlusTwo community, the mysterious player would have already be deemed guilty.

According to this thread, Peter Jepsen is believed to have been cheating fellow high stakes players for nearly a decade. Supposedly, even players like Viktor 'Isildur1' Blom and Dan 'Jungleman12' Cates have been victimized by this player.

The thread dates back to April of 2013, but more recent comments by Copenhagen police Commissioner Torben Koldbrog add legitimacy to the rumors. Koldbrog said through a statement that the player being investigated is 32 and even won an EPT tournament. Jepsen fits both of these billings since he's 32 and was victorious in the 2007 EPT Warsaw Main Event. At one point, the Dane was even forced by Bet365 to pay Blom back $800,000 over allegations of account sharing.

Of course, with the investigation still ongoing, nothing is official. So we'll have to wait on word from the Danish police on whether or not Jepsen is truly the mastermind behind the cheating. Speaking of which, police say that the perpetrator physically installed Trojan horse viruses on victims' computers so that he/she could see their hole cards. Much like the UB superuser scandal, this allowed the former Danish high stakes player to win an untold fortune from their opponents.

There are been reports from players at various EPT stops about their computers being tampered with. For example, Jens Kyllonen found that his laptop was missing at EPT Barcelona, only to be returned to its original spot when he left to get security. After Kyllonen took his laptop to a specialist, they found that a Trojan horse virus had been placed on the computer. In this particular Danish case, one player found that their laptop had been tampered with and their home security cameras shut down. They were then able to determine that a Trojan horse had been put on their computer as well.